1886: Levuka five generations of gene-mix; but work racially divided: 430 Europeans, and around 1000 “half-caste FIjians, Samoans, Botu Muliana, and other Polynesians”

“The population of Levuka may be estimated at about 430 Europeans, or persons of European extraction, while the settled population of half-caste FIjians, Samoans, Rotu, Muliana,  and other Polynesians, is about double as many more.
Samoan sex-workers: They are of the same mixed nationality as may be observed in Suva, but a special feature is introduced hero in the presence of a large number of Samoan females, who occupy a position which may be  compared to a combination of the grisettes and lilanchisenses of Paris.
They are fine handsome women for Polynesians, much Inclined to embonpoint, and of a light brown colour.
  Rotumah sailors: A number of Rotumah men ato also to bo met with in Levuka ; they are natives of a small isolated island, situated about 200 miles to the northward of the group, but included in the colony.
They aro excellent  sailor men, and nearly all the inter-island trading vessels are manned by them. They are a short, thick-set, sturdy race, and differ materially in both language and and physical appearance from the natives of any other island.
  Chinese farmers and carpenters: There are also many more Chinamen In Levuka than in Suva, and the Celestial forms a very useful member of the community  providing the town with a plentiful supply of greenstuff, while others follow the trade of carpenters and cabinet makers, in which they excel.
The Mercury Supplement, (Hobart, Tasmania), Saturday 13 February, 1886.  This item appears written by a Levuka resident in early 1886, or late 1885.  It encourages tourism to Levuka, as a rest from an overheated Australia.  Author uses the name “Tasmanian”. Possibly Frederick Langham   Perhaps ship-owner and trader with a long term trading relationship with Levuka and Suva, for at least five years – since 1880.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: