David WHIPPYS’s Levuka dynasty; five Fijian partners and 12 known children with Adi TULIA, Yunus, Dorcas DELAU, and Tosaka LEVUKA

The photo shows Nantucket sailor and trader, David Whippy, a bold and commercially-minded adventurer, who created a Fijian dynasty; myriads of Whippys descended from this Levuka gene-source. He was recorded as married in Fiji 1827. This first David Whippy of Levuka was in Fiji by the age of 25, and died in Fiji, age 69. The first recorded child of his was born 1828.
At least 12 children:
He had 12 recorded children – and perhaps more, were unrecorded – from at least six partners. Carol Riley, in her impressively researched family tree reported the first David Whippy in Levuka, was born 15 February 1802, in Nantucket, Massachusetts, USA. His father was David WHIPPY b. circa 1769, d. 1812; and his mother Keziah BUNKER b. 22 September 1770.
The three David Whippys: : He also had a son called David Whippy. The first Levuka Whippy – father of David Junior – had at at least six partners; and at least 12 children. David senior, died 27 October 1871, Wainunu, Vanua Levu, Bua, Fiji and was buried in the “Old People’s Cemetery”, Wainunu, Vanua Levu, Bua, Fiji,
Family one: A Marriage was recorded 1827, Namara, Tailevu, Fiji, to Adi Tulia. One child was recorded as David (Junior) WHIPPY b. 1828, d. 1867, according to an interview, with William Eason in 1985.
Family 2: A marriage was reported but not verified) in to 1831 to “Yunus”. Children were Thomas WHIPPY b. c 1850, d. 17 Dec 1934, Daniel WHIPPY b. c 1852.
Family 3: Unnamed Fijian woman; one child Peter WHIPPY+ b. c 1834, d. 26 Feb 1889
Family 4: A Marriage was reported around 1836, Methodist, Levuka, Ovalau, Lomaiviti, Fiji to Dorcas DELAUS. the children recorded were Alameda WHIPPY+ b. c 1836; Samuel WHIPPY+ b. c 1837, d. 1910; Kezia WHIPPY+ b. c 1838, d. 6 Jul 1898; Julia WHIPPY+ b. c 1840; Mary WHIPPY+ b. 1842; Sarah WHIPPY b. c 1845; and Elizabeth WHIPPY b. c 1847, d. 2 Aug 1882.
See more at http://www.caroleriley.id.au/familyTree/p101.htm#i6294

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December 1838: Wesleyan reinforcements from Britain came to Lakeba

Wesleyan reinforcements from Britain came to Lakeba in December 1838, bringing supplies sufficient to compensate Cargill, Gross and their families for the loss of their household goods. The three new missionaries, John Hunt, James Calvert and Thomas Jaggar, all came direct to Fiji in response to appeals in the English religious press. Jaggar, a printer, soon transferred his machinery from Lakeba to Rewa, and later to the

Scandal: The mission was deprived of his skill following a sexual encounter with a young Fiji girl on Viwa in 1848. Calvert manned Lakeba for ten years at the beginning of his long service to Fiji; he became an expert on the islands and lived to be present at the celebrations of the mission’s first quarter century and half century. Hunt, the other member of the gifted trio, ranks with the most able and dedicated Christian missionaries of any period.

Source unknown.

1838: Wesleyan missionaries John Hunt and Hannah Summers in Fiji: description of records held in Mitchell Library- Sydney

1838: Wesleyan missionaries John Hunt and Hannah Summers in Fiji: description of records held in Mitchell Library- Sydney. Reference code(s): GB 0102 MMS Boxes 649-650 Held at: School of Oriental and African Studies

Title: Hunt, John Date(s): 1833-1938

Level of description: Collection (fonds)

Extent: 2 boxes

Name of creator(s): Hunt | John | 1812-1848 | missionary

CONTEXT

Administrative/Biographical history:

Born, 1812; educated in a parish school; farm labourer from c1822; became a Methodist, c1828; studied in his spare time and became a preacher at Swinderby and Potter Hanworth, Lincolnshire; went to study at the Wesleyan Theological Institution, Hoxton, 1835; was ordained and married Hannah Summers (b 1812), 1838; Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society missionary to Fiji, 1838-1848; worked in Rewa, Somosomo, Lakemba, and Viwa (Vewa), travelling to visit various mission stations on the Fijian islands; worked on the translation of the Bible, completing the New Testament and beginning the Old Testament; knowledgeable about Fijian culture; his evangelistic work was successful and he was instrumental in the conversion of the warrior Varani, 1845; died of dysentery, 1848; buried at Viwa; survived by his wife and children, including their eldest daughter, Eliza-Ann, and their second daughter, Hannah, who married Lewis Richings.

Publications: Memoir of the Rev W Cross … missionary to the Friendly and Feejee Islands; with a short notice of the early history of the Missions (1846); Entire Sanctification (1853); the Fijian New Testament, published as Ai Vola ni Veiyalayalati Vou ni noda turaga kei na nodai vakabula ko Jisu Kraisiti (1853), was largely his work, and the whole Bible was published as Ai Vola Tabu, a ya e tu kina na Veiyalayalati Makawa, kei na Veiyalayalati Vou (1858-1864).

CONTENT

Scope and content/abstract:

Papers, 1833-1938, of and relating to John Hunt and his family, comprising correspondence, 1833-1868, of John and Hannah Hunt, the correspondents mainly family members but including some other missionaries; ‘scrapbook’ kept at the Wesleyan Theological Institution, Hoxton, commencing 1835, containing entries by Hunt on religious subjects; certificates, 1838, of ordination and oath of allegiance; Hunt’s journals, 1838-1848, including the journey to Fiji and life and work there, one volume including an autobiographical account of his early life and religious experiences; Hunt’s sermon notes and religious writings, largely undated [1830s-1840s], including a volume presented to R B Lyth, 1842; poems by Hunt, including some Fijian verses, undated; Hunt’s manuscript memoir of the Rev William Cross [1843-1844]; pen believed to have belonged to John Hunt; photographic copies of a portrait of Hunt; the first Tongan Bible [published in 1839], with an inscription regarding its provenance, 1842; printed letter by James Calvert on Hunt’s death, 1848; biographical account of Hunt [by R B Lyth] [after 1848]; notebook [of Hannah Hunt], some entries inscribed E A Hunt and dated 1860, including notes on Lincolnshire and other English localities, the Scriptures, poetry, Shakespeare, and history; notebook of poems from Elsie and Hannah Hunt to their mother [Hannah Hunt], 1875; photograph [of Hannah Hunt]; miscellaneous papers of Hannah Hunt Richings, 1864-1881, including photographs of her and her husband Lewis, undated; notebook of Eliza-Ann Hunt, containing diary entries, 1874-1888, and other entries including poetry and stories; papers, 1920-1938, including letters, press cuttings, and notes, relating to John Hunt, his work in Fiji, and his Lincolnshire connections.

ACCESS AND USE

Language/scripts of material: English, Fijian and Tongan

System of arrangement:

Conditions governing access:

Unrestricted, but only to be viewed on microfiche. Originals to be consulted only with written agreement from the Methodist Church.

Conditions governing reproduction:

No publication without written permission. Apply to archivist in the first instance.

Finding aids:

Unpublished handlist.

ARCHIVAL INFORMATION

Archival history:

The papers were deposited with the Methodist Missionary Society and form part of the special series of biographical papers of individual missionaries.

Immediate source of acquisition:

Deposited on permanent loan with the records of the Methodist Missionary Society from 1978.

ALLIED MATERIALS

Existence and location of copies:

Published on microfiche by IDC Publishers (SOAS ref: Fiche Box Number Special Series 36-7). Microfilm in the Mitchell Library, Sydney, Australia.

Related material:

The School of Oriental and African Studies holds the records of the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society (Ref: MMS/WMMS), including a letter from J Hunt and R Lyth in Vewa, 1844 (Ref: MMS/WMMS Australasia Correspondence Fiji).

Manchester University, Methodist Archives and Research Centre, holds Hunt’s memoranda book and diary, 1836-1837. The National Library of New Zealand, Alexander Turnbull Library, holds seven volumes of Hunt’s journal and sermons, 1841-1848.

DESCRIPTION NOTES

Archivist’s note: Compiled by Rachel Kemsley as part of the RSLP AIM25 project. Sources: Dictionary of National Biography; Biographical Dictionary of Christian Missions, ed Gerald H Anderson (1998); Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Ministers (1847); Wesleyan Methodist Church Minutes of Conference (1849), pp 180-1; National Register of Archives; British Library OPAC
.

Rules or conventions: Compiled in compliance with General International Standard Archival Description, ISAD(G), second edition, 2000; National Council on Archives Rules for the Construction of Personal, Place and Corporate Names, 1997.

Date(s) of descriptions: Mar 2002
http://www.aim25.ac.uk/cgi-bin/search2?coll_id=5490&inst_id=19

In June 1838 a large canoe provided byTaufa’ahau of Ha’apai, the future king of all Tonga, brought to Lakeba six more teachers to serve the Fiji mission:

In June 1838 a large canoe provided by Taufa’ahau of Ha’apai, the future king of all Tonga, brought to Lakeba six more teachers to serve the Fiji mission: Joeli Pulu (spelt Bulu in Fijian), Sailosi Fa’one, Siuliasi Naulivou, Uesile Langi, Selemaia Latu and Semisi Havea. Guided by Cargill, they acquired the dialect of Lau.

Long succession of Tongan missionaries: Their names, renowned in the annals of Fiji, indicate at this early stage the importance of a long succession of Tongan missionaries who used their country’s many contacts in Fiji to introduce their faith. By the time these Tongans arrived Gross had gone on ahead to Bau and Rewa, following Josua Mateinaniu’s track. Peter Dillon , the Irish Roman Catholic mariner, transported him, at a price, to Bau. Unfortunately Tanoa, the highest chief, was found to be not at home. Gross met his son, Seru, the future Cakobau. Young, wild in his appearance, very much incontrol of the interview, he told Gross he could stay if he wished on Bau, but that his safety was not guaranteed. Gross, with prudence but limited foresight, decided to go on and try Tui Dreketi, the highest chief of nearby Rewa on the Viti Levu mainland, who was at that time allied with Bau.

Cakobau not impressed with Gross: There he was offered the protection he sought and decided to settle. The meeting between Gross and Cakobau retarded Wesleyan advance in Fiji. Gross, small of stature and sensitive, was no chief. In Fiji men were measured by their physical presence and airof authority. John Hunt, who later earned Cakobau’s respect, once observed that one of the pre-Christian high chiefs at Rewa feared Hunt as a likely spiritual competitor because Hunt, unlike Cross, was tall. Cakobau, always eager to appropriate white men of any kind for his ownadvantage, was also piqued because Gross went to Rewa instead of residing on Bau.

1844: John Williams, missionary barque 296 tons, Capt Morgan, Cape of Good Hope, 31st Aug, and Hobart Town 22nd Oct.

In 1844 The Missionary barque John Williams “with missionary stores (and) Passengers for Sydney—Mrs Allen, Mr Want and Mr Udny. For the Society Islands—Miss Barff, and Miss Credland. For Harvey’s Islands—Mr George Gill and Mrs Gill. For the Samoan Islands—Rev Thomas Heath, Rev J P Sunderland, Mrs Sunderland, Rev T Powell, Mrs Powell, Mrs Gibson and child, a native of the Samoan Islands and one of Harvey Islands.

It will be remembered by most of our readers, that the expense of building this fine vessel was raised by subscription by children attending Sunday schools in England. Reports it had reached Sydney of her being a superior vessel, and upon inspection she exceeds what was anticipated. She was launched at Harwich on 20th March 1844 in the presence of a vast concourse of people, notwithstanding the morning was very wet and cold. The children and teachers of the Sabbath school in connexion with the Wesleyan congregation of the town were also present.

From Harwich the John Williams was taken to London to be fitted out, where the young ladies of Wycliffe Chapel presented Captain Morgan with a handsome flag, bearing the name of the ship, and the dove bearing an olive branch, as an emblem of peace. The dimensions of the vessel are 103 feet over all, 24 feet 8 inches in breadth and 16 feet depth of hold, the measurement of her being 296 tons. Her saloon is lofty and spacious, and she has also ten large State-rooms, which are commodiously fitted up. She is a very fast sailer, and her rigging, spars, sails, boats of the very best description. This is the third ship which the Missionary Society has had.

The first was the Duff – Captain James Wilson, which sailed from England for the South Sea Islands in August 1796. On board her were twenty-nine Missionaries, some of whom were married, and had large families; they arrived in Tahiti in the following March, where eighteen were landed, and the remainder were taken on to Tongataboo. The Duff returned to England by the way of Canton in 1798 and left again with about the same number of Missionaries in December of that year, when she was captured by a French privatee called the Buonaparte, in February 1799 off South America. After the capture of this vessel the Society had none of their own until 1838; the schooner Messenger of Peace, built at Raratonga in 1827, having belonged to Mr Williams; and when the news of her loss reached England, the directors of the Missionary Society resolved on purchasing a ship entirely for the use of their missions in the South Seas. A subscription was raised for this purpose to the amount of £4000, with which the brig Camden was bought, and fitted out in 1838, at an expense of £250 extra. After being actively engaged for five years in these seas, she returned to England, and being considered too small for the purposes required, was sold. It was then resolved to obtain a larger one, and for that purpose, an appeal was made to the juvenile friends of the Society, by whom £6237 were paid to the Treasurer. With that sum the John Williams has been bought and fitted out”. United Service Gazette.
http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/australia/au1844d.htm

1838: Wesleyan Methodist Missionary James Calvert arrives in Fiji

James Calvert  1813-1892 , missionary married to Mary Calvert 1814-1882,. nee Fowler was born in Pickering, Yorkshire, England, 1813; a printer, bookbinder, and bookseller; while ill, a mystical experience drew him to missionary work. In 1831 he completed his studies at the Wesleyan Theological Institution, Hoxton, 1837; married Mary Fowler (1814-1882) and, with his wife and his friend John Hunt, sailed to Fiji for the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society.

1838-1856 worked at Rewa and Lakeba; He then returned to England to oversee publication of the Fijian Bible, 1856; returned to Fiji, 1857; returned to England, 1866; served as a missionary in South Africa, 1872-1880; minister at City Road, London, 1881; Croydon, 1882; went to Fiji for the mission jubilee, 1885; toured Australia and America on behalf of the mission; retired to England; minister at Finsbury Park, 1887; continued to revise the Fijian Bible; died at Hastings, 1892.

Publications: Copy of a Letter addressed to the Rev Dr Hannah … on the death of the Rev John Hunt [1849]; ‘Mission History’, in Thomas Williams, Wesleyan Missionary: Fiji and the Fijians, vol 2, ed George Stringer Rowe (1858); edited: John Hunt’s Entire Sanctification (1853); John Hunt’s translation of the New Testament into Fijian, Ai Vola ni Veiyalayalati Vou ni noda turaga kei na nodai vakabula ko Jisu Kraisiti (1853); David Hazlewood’s A Feejeean and English dictionary (2nd edition [1872]).

Custodial history: The papers were deposited with the Methodist Missionary Society and form part of the special series of biographical papers of individual missionaries.
Immediate source of acquisition: Deposited on permanent loan with the records of the Methodist Missionary Society from 1978.

Scope and content/abstract: Papers, 1837-1910s, of James Calvert and his wife Mary, including James Calvert’s journals, 1838-1886 (some gaps), including his experiences in Fiji and South Africa; Mary Calvert’s journal, 1863-1866; certificates, 1838, including those for ordination and marriage; personal and family papers, 1839-1887, including baptismal certificates, 1839-1846, photographs of children, and poems; correspondence of James and Mary Calvert, 1837-1892, the correspondents including John Hunt and other ministers, and members of the Calvert and Fowler families; memoranda books on missionary conferences in Adelaide, 1866, Grahamstown, 1873, 1880, and Bloemfontein, 1874; printed proceedings of conferences at Pietermaritzburg, 1877, and Natal, 1878; manuscript notes and addresses, 1830s-1890s, including autobiographical notes, sermons, and anecdotes of mission life; c30 bills, 1870-1890; press cuttings and articles by or about Calvert, 1840s-1910s.

Conditions governing access: Unrestricted, but only to be viewed on microfiche. Originals to be consulted only with written agreement from the Methodist Church.

Conditions governing reproduction: No publication without written permission. Apply to archivist in the first instance.

Related material: The School of Oriental and African Studies holds the records of the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society (Ref: MMS/WMMS), including letters from James Calvert (Ref: MMS/WMMS Australasia Correspondence Fiji).

Copies: Published on microfiche by IDC Publishers (SOAS ref: Fiche Box Number Special Series 33-5). Microfilm in the Mitchell Library, Sydney, Australia.
Archivist’s note: Compiled by Rachel Kemsley as part of the RSLP AIM25 project. Sources: Biographical Dictionary of Christian Missions, ed Gerald H Anderson (1998); Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Ministers (1888); Wesleyan Methodist Church Minutes of Conference (1892), pp 30-2; British Library OPAC.
Reference code(s): GB 0102 MMS Boxes 645-648  Held at: School of Oriental and African Studies Library
Date(s) of descriptions: Mar 2002

1838: Port Jackson ship Nimrod was at Kadava in 1838: Vedovi kidnapped the mate and a boat’s crew, and held them to ransom

When the Port Jackson ship Nimrod was at Kadava in 1838, the now notorious Vedovi kidnapped the mate and a boat’s crew, and held them to ransom. For their release he demanded some large whales’ teeth, four axes, two plates, a case of pipes, some fish-hooks and iron pots, and a bale of cloth.

Whalers trade cycles: In addition to the beche-de-mer ships, whalers frequented certain parts of the Group, especially Tavuki Bay, Kadavu. Whaling among the Pacific Islands began about the same time as the sandalwood trade, and was carried on chiefly by ships from Port Jackson and the New England ports of America.

• The whales made annual migrations from the cold Antarctic seas to tropical waters, for the purpose of breeding. Sperm or Cachalot whales began to appear among the islands about the middle of the year, being most plentiful during August and September; and they returned south in the spring, to feed on the profile surface organisms or plankton, to be found among the breaking ice so the Antarctic.

The whalers followed the whales;

• Before the season opened, ships would visit Tahiti, Tonga, Rotuma, Norfolk Island, or Fiji, to recruit labour and to take on water and provisions;

• during the winter months they fished off these islands; and in

• the summer they went south to fish off New Zealand.

• When the season was over, the ships proceeded to the Bay of Islands or any other convenient anchorage on the New Zealand coast here they took in supplies of pigs, potatoes, fish, wood, and water, and refitted their rigging in preparation for the next season or the homeward voyage.

Cachalot whale teeth as currency: The teeth of the Cachalot whale, which the whalers had in considerable numbers, were used in Fiji for purposes of barter. After their introduction to Fiji, from Tonga, late in the eighteenth century, they had replaced the ancient form of tabua used in the traditional ceremonies; and the Fijians set a high value upon them.
http://www.janesoceania.com/fiji_discovery1/index.htm